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Willesborough Infant School

Willesborough Infants School

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READING

There are three skills necessary for reading:

  1. Word recognition ~ decoding (blending) and encoding (segmenting)
  2. Understanding and interpreting texts
  3. Engaging with and responding to texts

At Willesborough Infant School we aim to:

  •  Develop a love of reading in our children
  • Teach children to read accurately, fluently and independently
  • Support children to understand the meaning of what is read to them
  • Develop children’s understanding of and response to the texts they read
  • Provide a wide variety of genres and stimuli
  • Enable children to use reading skills to access all areas of the curriculum
  • Develop the understanding that reading allows us to make connections with others
  • Stimulate and enhance children’s writing through their reading experience
  • Develop the ability to use reading to access the past, the future, and other worlds both real and imagined

At Willesborough Infant School our core scheme is Oxford Reading Tree. This is broadened and enriched by additional schemes and core texts.

Reading is enhanced through inviting class book corners, a well stocked library with fiction, non fiction and picture books, big books, story sacks, and kindles.

In order to ensure that our teaching of reading is as effective as possible we will:

  • Access a wide variety of factual, fictional, poetry and reference material to support our class topics
  • Have daily regular reading sessions where the teacher models the reading process, and children are involved through listening, following the text, joining in, and contributing to discussion and response
  • Have regular guided reading sessions to help children to understand and interpret texts, encouraging them to engage and respond to text
  • Consistently teach “Letters and Sounds” across the school
  • Have regular specified time for quiet reading in each class
  • Provide a guided free choice of reading materials in the class
  • Promote book corners and a vibrant school library which help to foster a love of books and reading

PHONICS

We use  the 'Letters and Sounds' document across Foundation Stage and Key Stage One. Every child takes part in a daily phonics lesson. Our phonics lessons are fun, interactive and pacey. The teaching of phonics is carefully differentiated within classes to match the varying needs of children. In the early stages of learning, Jolly Phonics resources are used to teach phonics.

WRITING

We foster a love of writing from the earliest stages of learning. Children are taught to write in shared, guided and independent contexts within their daily LIteracy lessons. Opportunities for writing are incorprated into the children's learning environments and we aim to inspire them to write in their own time as well as in directed time. The application of writing for a range of purposes is incorporated into other areas of children's learning through topics. We are very proud of our 'Write What You Like!' strategy which was devised and developed by WIS and has now been cascaded to many other schools.

We celebrate Literacy by providing the children with regular enrichment opportunities such as; storytelling days, author visits, illustrator visits, drama workshops. Every year we celebrate 'Book Week'. This children enjoy a range of activities during this week.

In Reception we teach the children to print the letters of the alphabet, ensuring that they begin and end in the correct place. When children are ready to progress on to writing cursively they use the supported cursive document as a reference. We refer to the green dots and arrows to support the children in correctly forming the letters. Please support your children with this at home.

Spelling is an integral part of our curriculum. We encourage our children to learn how to spell tricky words and common exception words correctly, using the mats below to support them. The tricky words can't be sounded out using phonics, the children have to learn how to spell them by using their alphabet names and by creating photographic pictures of these words in their heads. We give the children opportunities to practise these words by playing a range of spelling games, such as, hang man, creating the words in playdough, finding them in wordsearches etc. Our children love to practise these spelling by using rainbow writing. This is where the children change the colour of their pen each time they have written the word. Have fun creating games to support your children in developing their spelling knowledge!

TRICKY WORD Mat(please click on this link if you want to print a copy)

1 CEW Mat(please click on this link if you want to print a copy)

2 CEW Mat(please click on this link if you want to print a copy)

Developing Writing Progression Information Year By Year(Click on this link)

 Writing Progression Document

Introduce:

Poetry/Nursery Rhymes/Fiction:

Planning Tool –Story map

 

Whole class retelling of story

 

Understanding of beginning/ middle / end

 

Retell simple 5-part story:

Once upon a time

First / Then/Next

But

So

Finally,…..happily ever after

 

 

Non-fiction:

Factual writing closely linked to a story

 

Simple factual sentences based around a theme

Names

Labels

Captions

Lists

Message

 

Introduce:

Simple sentences

 

Simple Connectives:

and

who

until

but

 

Say a sentence, write  and read it back to check it makes sense.

 

 

Compound sentences using connectives

and / but

-‘ly’ openers

Luckily / Unfortunately,

 

‘Run’ - Repetition for rhythm:

e.g.

He walked and he walked

 

Repetition in description e.g.

a lean cat, a mean cat

Introduce:

Determiners

the

a

my

your

an

this

that

his

her

their

some

all

 

Prepositions:

up

down

in

into

out

to

onto

Adjectives  e.g. old, little, big, small, quiet

Adverbs e.g. luckily, unfortunately, fortunately

Similes – using ‘like’

Introduce:

Finger spaces

 

Full stops

 

Capital letters

Introduce:

Finger spaces

 

Letter

 

Word

 

Sentence

 

Full stops

 

Capital letter

 

Simile – ‘like’

 

YEAR 1     Text Structure

Sentence Construction

Word Structure/Language

Punctuation

Terminology

Consolidate FS list

Introduce:

Poetry/Traditional/Fairy tales/Fiction:

 

Planning Tools: Story map

 

Plan opening around character(s), setting, time of day and type of weather

 

Understanding - beginning /middle /end  to a story

 

Understanding  - 5 parts to a story:

 

Opening

Once upon a time…

 

Build-up

One day…

 

Problem / Dilemma

Suddenly,../ Unfortunately,…

 

Resolution

Fortunately,…

 

Ending

Finally,….

 

 

Consolidate FS list

Introduce:

Types of sentences e.g:

Statements

Questions

Exclamations

 

Simple Connectives:

and                  so that

or                    then

but                 that

so                   while

because        when

where

 

Also as openers:

While…  

When…

Where…

-‘ly’ openers

Fortunately,…Unfortunately,   Sadly,…

Simple sentences e.g.

I went to the park.

The castle is haunted.

 

Embellished simple sentences using adjectives e.g.

The giant had an enormous beard.

Red squirrels enjoy eating delicious nuts.

 

Consolidate FS list

Introduce:

Prepositions:

inside

outside

towards

across

under

 

Determiners:

the  a   my  your   an  this  that  his   her   their  some  all   lots of    many   more   those   these

 

Adjectives to describe

e.g. The old house…

       The huge elephant…

 

Alliteration

e.g. dangerous dragon

       slimy snake

 

Similes using as….as… 

e.g. as tall as a house

       as red as a radish

 

 

Consolidate FS list

Introduce:

Capital Letters:

Capital letter for names

 

Capital letter for the personal pronoun I

 

Full stops

Question marks

Exclamation marks

Speech bubble

Bullet points

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consolidate FS list

Finger spaces

Letter

Word

Sentence

Full stops

Capital letter

Punctuation

Simile – ‘like’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 YEAR 1         Text Structure

Sentence Construction

Word Structure/Language

Punctuation

Terminology

Non-fiction:

Labels

Captions

Lists

Diagrams

Message

Instructions

Planning tools:

text map/washing line

 

Heading

 

Introduction

Opening factual statement

 

Middle section(s)

Simple factual sentences around a theme

Bullet points for instructions

Labelled diagrams

 

Ending

Concluding sentence

Compound sentences using connectives:

and/or/ but/so   e.g.

The children played on the swings and slid down the slide.

Spiders can be small or they can be large.

Charlie hid but Sally found him.

It was raining so they put on their coats.

Complex sentences:

Use of ‘who’ e.g.

Once upon a time there was a little old woman who lived in a forest.

There are many children who like to eat ice cream.

‘Run’ - Repetition for rhythm e.g.

He walked and he walked and he walked.

Repetition for description

e.g.

a lean cat, a mean cat

a green dragon, a fiery dragon

Precise, clear language to give information e.g.

First, switch on the red button.

Next, wait for the green light to flash...

 

Regular plural noun suffixes –s or –es

(e.g. dog, dogs; wish, wishes)

 

Suffixes that can be added to verbs (e.g. helping, helped, helper)

 

How the prefix un– changes the meaning of verbs and adjectives

(negation, e.g. kind/unkind, doing/r undoing, e.g. untie the boat)

 

Introduce:

 

Question mark

 

Exclamation mark

 

Speech bubble

 

Bullet points

 

Singular/ plural

 

Adjective

 

Verb

 

Connective

 

Alliteration

 

Simile – ‘as’

 

YEAR 2     Text Structure

Sentence Construction

Word Structure/Language

Punctuation

Terminology

Consolidate Year 1 list

Introduce:

Poetry/Traditional/Fairy tales/Fiction:

Secure use of planning tools: Story map /story mountain

 

Plan opening around character(s), setting, time of day and type of weather

 

Understanding  5 parts to a story with more complex vocabulary

 

Opening e.g.

In a land far away….

One cold but bright morning…..

Build-up e.g.

Later that day

Problem / Dilemma e.g.

To his amazement

Resolution e.g.

As soon as

Ending e.g.

Luckily, Fortunately,

 

Ending should be a section rather than one final sentence e.g. suggest how the main character is feeling in the final situation.

 

Consolidate Year 1 list

Introduce:

Types of sentences:

Statements

Questions

Exclamations

Commands

 

-‘ly’ starters

e.g.  Usually, Eventually, Finally, Carefully, Slowly, …

 

Vary openers to sentences

 

Embellished simple  sentences using:

adjectives e.g. The  boys peeped inside the dark cave.

 

adverbs e.g. Tom ran quickly down the hill.

 

Secure use of compound sentences (Coordination) using connectives:

and/ or / but / so

(coordinating  conjunctions)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consolidate Yr 1 list

Introduce:

Prepositions:

behind   above    along      before   between    after

 

Alliteration

e.g.  wicked witch

         slimy slugs

 

Similes using…like…

e.g.

… like sizzling sausages

…hot like a fire

 

Two adjectives to describe the noun

e.g.

The scary, old woman…

Squirrels have long, bushy tails.

 

Adverbs for description

e.g.

Snow fell gently and covered the cottage in the wood.

 

 

 

 

 

Consolidate Yr1

Introduce:

 

Demarcate sentences:

Capital letters

 

Full stops

 

Question marks

 

Exclamation marks

 

Commas to separate items in a list

 

Comma after –ly opener

e.g. Fortunately,….Slowly,….

 

Speech bubbles /speech  marks for direct speech

 

Apostrophes to mark contracted forms in spelling

e.g. don’t, can’t

 

Consolidate Yr1

Punctuation

  • Finger spaces
  • Letter
  • Word
  • Sentence
  • Full stops
  • Capital letter
  • Question mark
  • Exclamation mark
  • Speech bubble
  • Bullet points

 

Singular/ plural

 

Adjective

Verb

Connective

Alliteration

 

Simile – ‘as’/ ‘like’

 

 

 

 

 

YEAR 2     Text Structure

Sentence Construction

Word Structure/Language

Punctuation

Terminology

Non-Fiction:

Introduce:

Secure use of planning tools: Text map /washing line

Introduction:                                                            Heading

Hook to engage  reader                                                                            Factual statement / definition

Opening question

 

Middle section(s)

Group related ideas/facts into sections

Sub headings to introduce sentences/sections

Use of lists – what is needed/lists of steps to be taken

Bullet points for facts

Diagrams                                  

Ending                                                            Make final comment to reader                                         

The consistent use of present tense versus past tense throughout texts

 

Use of the continuous form of verbs in the present and past tense to mark actions in progress (e.g. she is drumming, he was shouting)

Complex sentences (Subordination) using:

Drop in a relative clause:

who/which  e.g.

Sam, who was lost, sat down and cried.

 

The Vikings, who came from Scandinavia, invaded Scotland.

 

The Fire of London, which started in Pudding Lane, spread quickly.

 

Additional subordinating conjunctions:

what/while/when/where/ because/ then/so that/ if/to/until  

e.g. While the animals were munching breakfast, two visitors arrived

During the Autumn, when the weather is cold, the leaves fall off the trees.

 

Use long and short sentences:

Long sentences to add description or information. Use short sentences for emphasis.

 

Expanded noun phrases

e.g. lots of people, plenty of food

   

List of 3 for description   

e.g. He wore old shoes, a dark cloak and a red hat.

African elephants have long trunks, curly tusks and large ears.

 

Adverbs for information e.g.

Lift the pot carefully onto the tray.

The river quickly flooded the town.

 

Generalisers for information, e.g.

Most dogs….

Some cats….

 

Formation of nouns using suffixes such as –ness, –er

 

Formation of adjectives

 

using suffixes such as –ful, –less

 

(A fuller list of suffixes can be found in the spelling appendix.)

 

Use of the suffixes –er and –est to form comparisons of adjectives and adverbs

 

Introduce:

 

Apostrophe (contractions only)

 

Commas for description

 

‘Speech marks’

 

Suffix

 

Verb/adverb

 

Bossy verbs

 

Tense (past/present, future)

 

Adjective/noun

 

TRICKY WORD MAT(please click to print)